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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
dozens of u.s. military bases and strike israel within minutes. this coming from a general in iran's revolutionary guard. cons week, their military carrying out large-scale war games. they are testing a medium range missile on mockups of american bases. and while iranian military leaders claim they could hit american targets within about 1300 miles, the defense experts say iran's military is no match for the u.s. of course, iran and much of the west have been in a diplomatic standoff over that nation's nuclear program. the iranians claiming the program is for peaceful purposes but many around the world doubt it. and another threat, which we have heard before, iran now saying it will stop certain oil tankers in the strait of hormuz, which would effect the delivery of one fifth of the world's oil supply. the u.s. already moving military assets to that region to counter any potential attack. jennifer griffin live with the news in washington tonight. jennifer, how seriously is the pentagon taking this latest threat to hit our bases? >> well, they're mindful, harris. this is the third d
though it can typically go further, up to 1200 miles. the u.s. has been positioning patriot missile batteries across the region to protect their bases, harris. >> well, which western targets are most at risk at this point? >> well, there is the fifth fleet base in bahrain and united arab emirates and qatar. 30,000 u.s. troops in the gulf. the commander of revolutionary guards aerospace division said today quote, these bases are all in range of our missiles and the occupied lands. he was referring to israel are also good targets for us. western oil tankers are also targets, especially u.s. and european flag tankers making their way through the strait of hormuz. iran has threatened to target anyone oil elm bar go that began on july 1st. today we heard that kenya is canceling agreement to buy 4 million tons of crude a year 40 billion a day in light new sanctions, harris. >> harris: diplomatically along what they have said stick to the sanctions to keep them to work. one agency breaking saxes to iran. >> eu sanctions. and we're now learning that a wing of the u.n. that is responsible fo
.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. a record-setting heat wave in the eastern u.s. is starting to ease after two weeks of scorching temperatures. the heat wave has been blamed for causing at least 74 deaths from the midwest to the east coast, including 18 people around chicago and 13 people in maryland. all-time highs hit major cities including philadelphia, washington, said louis, indianapolis, and louisville, with more than 4500 heat records broken overall. dry conditions and a lack of rain are also devastating corn crops across the plains, which faces its worst drought in 25 years. although eastern states will see a respite, western states are facing a potential heat wave that could bring record highs later this week. to see our coverage of the latest u.s. heat wave and global warming, go to democracynow.org. president obama is expected to resume a long-running dispute with republicans to the of the bush era tax cuts that favor the wealthy and plunge the nation as a further deficit. in a rose garden address, obama will renew his call to limit the tax cuts extension to those
>> gretchen: we're back outside with the girl scouts who will perform another number for us in the after the show show. thanks for being here today. >> clayton: happy independence day, everyone. enjoy this day. >> peter: god bless america. >> gretchen: here is to america. see you tomorrow. overseas this morning. a u.s. apology ended a bitter seven-month standoff with pakistan. the company reopening a critical border route that is up price nato forces in afghanistan. islamabad blocked the supply route after a nato airstrike killed 24 pakistani soldiers. good morning once again. i'm martha maccallum. we're here in "america's newsroom". gregg: happy independence day. i'm gregg jarrett in for bill. an apology critics are calling too easy but the agreement could save the united states $100 million every month. secretary of state hillary clinton having a telephone conversation with pakistan's prime minister discussing the death that led both countries into that bitter debate. clinton saying quote, we are sorry for the losses suffered by the pakistani military. we are committed to
henneberg is live on the story for us in washington. molly, is the u.s. admitting that our military messed up with that airstrike? >> reporter: no, martha, to the contrary. it was a very carefully worded apology that did not take the blame for the airstrike. look at more what secretary of state hillary clinton said to her counterpart in pakistan. she said, quote, i offered our sincere condolences to the families of the pakistani soldiers who lost their lives. foreign minister carr and i talked about the mistakes that resulted in loss 6 pakistani military lives. we are sorry for the losses suffered by the pakistani military. the obama administration declined to apologize for the past seven months. u.s. military leaders did a investigation and found that pakistani forces fired at u.s. troops and helicopters first prompting the u.s. response that killed 24 pakistani troops. although pakistan did not get the quote, unconnal apology it had asked for today the land routes between pakistan and afghanistan will reopen. martha. martha: in the end of it what the united states got out of it, molly? >
what kristen was mentioning to us, the president kicking off his bus tour tomorrow. pawlenty and jindal will bracketing with him and rob portman as well, traveling to new hampshire this weekend. no word if he'll be meeting with romney. where do we stand in terms of the what's the messaging we're looking for going forward as the president goes out there and tries to make the message, put the message out there, that romney is a jobs expovertier? >> of course, the message that the obama campaign has been pushing hard from the very beginning is attacking mitt romney's record at bain capital. and as controversial as that tactic has been from both republicans and democrats, most notably corey booker and bill clinton, that's really the lane that the obama campaign is staying in. and they're sort of attacking bain capital from every angle they can find, their latest political attack ad against romney focused on bain capital investing in companies that ship jobs overseas. and that's -- i think it's a strategy that's really been working for the obama campaign. he's been able to paint romney as so
to make sure that we are using for example the small business review process to ensure that the rules ask crafted can ease compliance where necessary especially with respect to smaller firms. smaller firms be they depositories jarmon depositories are by their nature less able to easily shoulder significant compliance costs tend to be more fixed than variable which means to the extent it firm is smaller on the compliance board and would be more biting and constraining and so the basic to make sure we are attentive as applied to the various regulatory requirements. >> which is one of my concerns. i keep getting that feedback from our small banks and credit unions about the compliance costs with the new rules coming out. within this efp, those are dillinger of disclosure issues as well as other disclosure forms. are you all communicating so when qr m comes out we are not going to have different ways of compliance issues for the small banking institutions? are you all talking together so it's going to be very fluid and we and are not going to have one rule come out but would then be modified
and let them use it to increase the voice of private schools, strip you of your voice because he doesn't think that you all know much about how to educate, and he characterizes you and his allies characterize you as not caring about -- not caring about the students, but about yourself. my jill is little when she says that teaching is not what she does. it's who she is. [applause] these guys don't get that. i don't think they don't understand why you chose to teach in the first place. [applause] i honest to god don't think they understand. and by the way, like in politics, in business, religious hierarchy, there is really good teachers and there is really lousy teachers. there is a really lousy teachers and some plain good teachers. we are no different than any other profession in the world. but we are a profession. [applause] we are a profession! this is a calling. you chose to be teachers because you care. you choose to be teachers because you want to make this country better. you chose to be teachers because you know every child -- every child is entitled -- entitled to go as far as
from the depths of ocean. it is all "happening now." jenna: hi, everybody, we're glad your with us on a very busy news day. i'm jenna lee. we have brand new fox news polls on the election, on the economy and who voters would like to see on the republican ticket with governor mitt romney. jon: i'm jon scott. 110 days until americans head to the polls. what are we thinking about the state the race and issues affecting it right now? first when asked whether the obama administration has made the economy better or worse, 37% of respondents say the president's policies have made the economy better. that is a seven-point drop from march. meanwhile those who say the economy has gotten worse, jumping seven points over that same period to 49%. look at the head-to-head race. the president with a razor thin lead over governor romney. nearly unchanged from a year ago. that is not all these polls tell us. erin mcpike is national political reporter for "real clear politics" and joins us now. erin, see if you can explain that. you have more people saying the president and his policies have made th
chart. that does it for us tonight. rachel will be back on thursday. don't forget, you can check out my work at wonkblog.com or follow me on twitter at twitter.com/ezraklein and on facebook, facebook.com/ezraklein. have a great fourth of july and >>> and happy fourth of july, 2012, everyone. this is msnbc, i'm richard lui. president obama is returning to the white house this morning to host a fourth of july barbecue for military families. he will also mark the holiday by speaking at a naturalization ceremony for military service members. joining us right now is nbc white house correspondent kristen welker. good morning to you. >> good morning to you. busy day here at the white house. >> the day kicks off with a naturalization ceremony. >> yes, 25 members of the military will be sworn in as u.s. citizens here at the white house. president obama will speak at that event. secretary of homeland security, janet napolitano will be a part of that event. a big day here. it's the first time they're going to hold a naturalization ceremony at the white house on independence day. this is the
to the department of communication for sponsoring this. thank you to all of you for joining us here today. please join us for a reception right outside. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> president barack obama's bus tour of ohio and pennsylvania it is under way. at his first stop today, the president told the crowd the outcome of the november election will determine the nation's economic future for the next 10 to 20 years. here is a portion. >> when the american auto industry was on the brink of collapse, and more than one million jobs were on the line, governor romney said we should just let detroit go bankrupt. >> that's what he said! >> i refused to turn my back on communities like this one. i was betting on the american worker and i was betting on american industry. [applause] and three years later, the american auto industry is coming roaring back. [applause] that chrysler plant up the road bringing on another 1,100 employees to make the cars that the world wants to buy. the wrangler built right here in toledo
gretchen carlson is here to help us out. she's always so good at this. >> that's a set-up, heather and heather. it's a holiday! so my brain is on holiday. here we go! >> fireworks! >> two in a row. >> bombs away. >> happy fourth to you, gretchen. >> heather, likewise. hope you have some fun today. >> see you back here tomorrow. "fox & friends" starts right now. >> happy fourth of july, everyone! good morning, it is wednesday, july 4, 2012, i'm gretchen carlson and you know what we can say today? happy birthday, america. let's celebrate. his vote made all the difference. chief justice john roberts upholding obamacare so why are we hearing reports he also wrote most of the dissent? he was busy. >> and this independence day, are dependents on government at an all time high? we're an entitlement nation, i'm afraid and some states getting rewarded for making sure we stay that way. >> sorry, folks. no fourth of july fireworks for one american town. they might upset the birds nesting. might be sleeping. we're not kidding. it will scare them and wake them up. "fox & friends" starts rig
>> that's the u.s. army guard fife and drum corps performing "yankee doodle dandy." it's one thing to be able to toot this holiday. they're able to toot those horns in wonderful fashion. >> yeah, no kidding. >> as a little kid, i had one of those hats and used to wear it all the time. i couldn't play something like this. that was fantastic. >> i feel like i'm time traveling, traveling back. >> with that tiffany's store over his shoulder. >> wonderful. mix of old and new today as we celebrate the fourth of july and america's birthday. thank you so much for tuning into "fox & friends" this morning. i'm flanked by clayton and peter johnson jr. today. good morning. >> good morning, thanks for having me. >> and we'd like to thank people today, right? >> we have some beautiful flowers on the set here at 1-800 flowers does a great job of setting up our set this morning and providing some color this morning. thank you so them. also this morning, we've got a veteran outside, a world war ii veteran who will pull a car with his teeth. >> can't wait to see that. >> do i need to say anythi
economic news three months in a row now. are people just used to it? is it baked in? do they just accept where this economy is? we hope not. we hope that we don't accept these numbers regardless of the politics of it. you hope people don't accept this as a new norm. >> do they think that mitt romney could do better? >> that's the big question. >> we're going to explore all of that this morning. let us know what you think. find us on twitter. rest of your headlines. a lot more to tell you '. there has been a drone strike in northwestern pakistan and killed at least 15 suspected taliban militants. pakistani intelligence says this happens in a village in north waziristan. four missiles fired at compound believed to be owned by taliban commander. this comes as tension grows over those american drone strikes in the country. it's the first strike since pakistan reopened nato supply routes this past week. george zimmerman is a free man yet again this morning. here he is leaving a florida jail after posting the required 10 pierce of his $1 million bond. is he now staying in a temporary safe hous
that came out this morning and that is retail sales? >> terrible. martha: what does that tell us about what is going on? >> it is a terrible number. sales in june declined .5%. that is huge decline and unexpected. it tells us the economy is clearly weakening. in may retail sales were down. june retail sales were down some more. and a new survey out of national economists and they say hiring is weakening all over again. so too are the sales figures which we just reported. they have a negative outlook. in fact, most of them are looking for growth rate in the economy of 2% or less. and that is not a solid performance. martha: yeah. there are so many indicators out there, stuart, as you point out that we're hitting yet another rough patch. >> yes, we are. martha: in the economy. stuart, thank you very much. good to see you as always this morning. bill: stuart was talking about the survey released by the national association of business economics. it says u.s. jobs growth appears worse than three months ago. of 67 economists surveyed, only 22% reported rising employment in july. that is down fro
was going to make you feel more uplifted this sunday morning, not so much. so, you know, i used to question when you look at the numbers, the more people went on disability, than were actual jobs in our economy, do you wonder is this an unfortunately consequence of the economy or something greater behind it, are the qualifications easier or people are encouraged to go on social security disability? why the drastic increase? >> and how much into this unemployed number we have been talking about, 5.4 million individuals long-term unemployed and the president yesterday on the campaign trail in ohio and pennsylvania, sees this though as a step in the right direction. >> we learned that our business created 84,000 new jobs last month and that overall means that businesses created 4.4 million new jobs over the past 28 months, including 500,000 new manufacturing jobs. that's a step in the right direction. [applause] >> that's a step in the right direction. >> alisyn: so the number of new enrollees to disability went up 19% higher than the jobs added. so, obviously, there is a big sort of discrepa
joins us live to explain the creative way protesters are protesting higher costs. le. >> reporter: yeah, students here are planning to protest the possibility of a fee increase for graduate students. uc regents are set too meet this morning. students say they will be at today's meeting and will be holding what they call a zombie takeover. they are encouraging people to come dressed as zombies. now, while the regents are expected to free tuition for undergrads, they may vote to increase fees foreother schools, like the nursing programs and -- for other schools, like the nursing programs and that could make these so many of the most expensive programs in the country. some students say the idea of an increase has them worrying. >> i'm considering an mba. that's not something i'm looking forward to, the higher fees. something to keep in mind. >> reporter: you can see some of those protesters starting to gather here. we're planning on talking with them before they head to the regents meeting in san francisco and then we'll be heading over toot meeting. we'll -- to the meeting. for now we're
taking the reports and doing something about them. and not giving us a global fix, which doesn't do us any good. really telling us your block, your neighborhood, we expect to get to it by this date. >> reporter: for many, independence day is a day of chipping away at downed trees and waiting for the lights to come back on fr. for some with no power on, the old farm pool was a great relief from the heat. today they are welcoming members of the tildon woods pool which was damaged in the storm. >> in addition to not having power, they have wires across their parking lot. we opened up our pool to their memberships so they can come up here and join us today for july 4th and the rest of the week until they get their power back. >> reporter: some of the folks here in montgomery county say they expect their power to come back on by 11:00 p.m. friday night. in the latest release by pepco, they say their restoration efforts will stretch into the weekend. darcy spencer, news 4. >>> some d.c. neighborhoods look like the storms hit maybe yesterday. this is warren street in northwest. that road stil
the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed the declaration of independence and what happened to them after they did. >> they were placed under house arrest. they had-- they were allowed to write letters home. they were visited by physicians. no one was ever tortured. that's something i have seen over the years and it is wrong. every time i see it, i shudder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill:
morning, allison. building inspectors arrived a short time ago taking a look at what used to be the cheer fusion dance studio. you see the yellow sign there, danger. this building, as you can imagine has been condemned. take a look at it. there is practically nothing left. there were about 25 people inside. students, intructors and parents, when the half dollar size hail rained down. people said it sounded like an explosion as the roof tore off and the cinderblock walls collapsed. the roof landed about 300 feet away on top of a home. the house was knocked off its foundation. people rushed inside to help the elderly couple out. we got video of the front of the fleming center that got hit first by the strong winds. there is a mat stress store, beauty shop with daylight where it shouldn't be because parts of the roof are missing or collapsed inside. now, the owner of the hair salon and her daughter were inside the building. they managed to run to a utility closet. when everything collapsed they got trapped inside. neighbors in this business park rushed to help them out and tony and allison,
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)